DSLR Camera Bodies

What is a DSLR?

DSLR stands for Digital Single Lens Reflex. Light travels into the camera (through the lens), where it hits a "reflex mirror", directing it to the top of the camera where it either hits a penta-prism or penta-mirror directing it to the view-finder. When you look through the eyepiece of a DSLR, you are looking (albeit indirectly) right down the lens. Alternatively the same image will appear in the "live view" screen.

Generally DSLR's come with either s "Full Frame Sensor", or a "Cropped Sensor". A cropped sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor - so that the image will look "cropped" next to an image taken at the same distance from a full frame camera. 

Full frame sensors tend to come in the high intermediate to professional end of the market.

The effect of having a cropped sensor can however be an advantage in some situations, because of what we call the "crop factor". If you use a cropped sensor, you have "in effect" a greater magnification from the lens. You don't actually get a greater magnification - but it may appear so because the image is "cropped" in. This can sometimes be an advantage in, for example, wildlife photography, when your subject is far away. This may be a hinderance if you are shooting landscapes, or want more scenery around your image. 

The shot to the right was taken at 300mm with a cropped sensor camera - but because of the "crop factor", the "effective range" of that lens was 450mm. If the puffin had been closer, I would have been very grateful for my full frame camera.

You can buy most cameras "body only", or in a "kit" - including body and lens / lenses etc.. 

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Generally DSLR's come with either s "Full Frame Sensor", or a "Cropped Sensor". A cropped sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor - so that the image will look "cropped" next to an image taken at the same distance from a full frame camera. 

Full frame sensors tend to come in the high intermediate to professional end of the market.

The effect of having a cropped sensor can however be an advantage in some situations, because of what we call the "crop factor". If you use a cropped sensor, you have "in effect" a greater magnification from the lens. You don't actually get a greater magnification - but it may appear so because the image is "cropped" in. This can sometimes be an advantage in, for example, wildlife photography, when your subject is far away. This may be a hinderance if you are shooting landscapes, or want more scenery around your image. 

The shot to the right was taken at 300mm with a cropped sensor camera - but because of the "crop factor", the "effective range" of that lens was 450mm. If the puffin had been closer, I would have been very grateful for my full frame camera.

You can buy most cameras "body only", or in a "kit" - including body and lens / lenses etc.. 


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